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Hypertufa Containers For Plumeria? Experiences good/bad Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   beach4me 

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 06:43 PM

Have people had success using hypertufa pots for plumeria? Any good comparisons vs. black plastic? I know the Arizona group had a meeting on the subject but I'm wondering how good they are. I can make one and dye it black, which I presume is the best color but I'd be interested in thoughts on that as well. Thank you. (I did a search on hypertufa in the forum and found no hits so I presume this is a legitimate question, please direct me if it's covered elsewhere).
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#2 User is offline   sharlan 

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 02:23 PM

What are hypertufa containers?
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#3 User is offline   LeftCoastAngler 

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  Posted 17 January 2009 - 02:37 AM

Kinda Funky! :)

http://www.efildoog-...m/hypertufa.htm

Too 'yard arty' for me. I think I'd rather do terra cota pottery...

~LCA.
Brandon, FL
27.95N 82.28W (Elev. 62 ft)
USDA Zone 9B
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#4 User is offline   dennis 

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Posted 17 January 2009 - 07:27 AM

Hello beach4me,

And thank you LeftCoastAngler for the link which will now become part of the archives

beach4me, this site was wiped out by a hacker and the archives are now slowly being rebuilt.

Heypertufa is very nice for creating your own pots but...you would need allot of spare time to create the pots. In the past I have read several articles relating to making your own pot using cement and the caution was always the same; the pots should be aged in a field for quite some time before using them for most plants. Because it will take time for the lime to leach out of them from the cement that was used to make them.

Best regards,
Dennis :)
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#5 User is offline   beach4me 

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Posted 17 January 2009 - 07:53 PM

View Postsharlan, on Jan 16 2009, 02:23 PM, said:

What are hypertufa containers?

Some links: wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertufa
And an example by the illustrious palmbob @ Dave's Garden:
http://davesgarden.c...nals/si/102990/
B
Someone has noted a lime consideration. Very true. There are also some plumie-friendly properties: it is porous, and it can be made to look Hawai'ian, like it was carved out of lava rock.
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#6 User is offline   LeslieC 

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 02:57 AM

Is this the same kinda thing as clay pots that we're not supposed to use?? Somewhere I've read that the roots stick to the clay pots and it makes it difficult to transplant the plumies
Posted Image
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#7 User is offline   LeftCoastAngler 

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 04:11 AM

Those roots'll be OK. They'll peel right off the containers, no problem.
These plants are ALOT more durable than you think.

You can even trim roots with scissors and transplant, and you wouldn't even notice anything in the foliage, damage wise... They handle shock very well...

~LCA.
Brandon, FL
27.95N 82.28W (Elev. 62 ft)
USDA Zone 9B
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#8 User is offline   beach4me 

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 08:14 PM

Mahalo nui loa for your comments, team. I hunted around on Dave's Garden and ran across a rare person who apparently knows this topic well, Palmbob. His comment was that they worked well, but he found them "too porous" for plumeria in LA's San Fernando Valley. Given my past rot issues, I should be so lucky as to have something that is "too porous". So I made some pots and am experimenting with them. Responders are correct, they are a pain to make, quite expensive to buy, and they must have the lime removed. Curtis suggested I try a few and see how it goes; ask me this Fall how it went.
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#9 User is offline   christine 

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 11:46 PM

hey left coast angler

how did you get this?

Brandon, FL
27.95N 82.28W (Elev. 62 ft)
USDA Zone 9B

i tried to find the same info for my area (in west palm beach) but i couldn't figure out where to go to find it...... any suggestions? thanks
Christine... lovin that south Florida sun!
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#10 User is offline   FLL Plumeria 

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 08:28 PM

The trick to getting Orchid roots unstuck from clay pots was to not do it while it was dry... but to dunk the whole pot in water a few minutes before removing the plant. It hydrates the roots and clay and they come free. I imagine you could do the same with plumies??
Patty in South Florida
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