Plumeria Forum: Air Rooting A Branch That Has Inflos - Plumeria Forum

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Air Rooting A Branch That Has Inflos Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 24 June 2011 - 10:58 AM

I have several plants with long big branches that have inflos on them, and would like to air-root them to make them shorter plants, but I'd hate to take off the leaves and inflos, as they look very healthy and happy right now.
Is it possible to air-root branches while still leaving leaves and inflos on? I have everything I need to do it, just need somebody to confirm that it's OK!
Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

Posted Image
0

#2 User is offline   Dutchlady 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2,739
  • Joined: 20-November 08
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Southwest Florida

Posted 24 June 2011 - 12:15 PM

I assume you mean air-layering? It should be no problem leaving everything on since the channel of nutrients is not interrupted.
Posted Image
0

#3 User is offline   bing 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1,136
  • Joined: 05-February 09

Posted 24 June 2011 - 12:38 PM

oooohhhhh hobby hour.... :)
Posted Image
0

#4 User is offline   plumania 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 17-September 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Florida
  • Interests:Gardening ,fragrant plants,Plumeria, Roses and too many other 'interests' to list here.

Posted 24 June 2011 - 01:54 PM

I was wondering about this too. Do we need to let it (prepared area) dry first? Also, do we apply a rooting hormone to the area before wrapping it up?
Since mine are mostly grafted plants, some of them grew too long before the first bloom. I would love to 'air root' so I will have 2 plants (one shorter with grafted bottom and other rooted cutting).
Posted Image
0

#5 User is offline   Shadow 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 826
  • Joined: 21-January 09
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:So CA

Posted 24 June 2011 - 06:16 PM

hmmm
I also have a few that would be good for.

I'll have to do some research but its basically wrapping some sort of medium around the branch.

Seems like a preferred method not to have to take a cutting to root the top.

:unsure:
Posted Image
0

#6 User is offline   jag 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 712
  • Joined: 17-May 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA

Posted 24 June 2011 - 06:38 PM

You do not need to let it dry. And you do not need to remove any leaves or inflows. If fact, I just cut off an air-layered plant with inflos and planted it and it continued blooming without any interruption.

All I do is peel off about an inch and a half of the cambium layer around the trunk or branch with a vegetable peeler.

I tried to do a search on some pictures I had posted, but I don't think they are in the archives any longer. Here they are again.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1521.jpg

I use Glad Press n Seal plastic wrap to make a bag and pack it with moistened coir. You can also use dampened peat moss or spaghum moss.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1522.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1523.jpg

This is what it looked like after I separated it from the mother plant.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1528.jpg

To me, that is the beauty of air-layering, there is no interruption in the growth of the plant. I do it often with seedlings when they get too tall while I am waiting for then to bloom.
Joe

Posted Image
0

#7 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 24 June 2011 - 06:43 PM

View PostDutchlady, on 24 June 2011 - 12:15 PM, said:

I assume you mean air-layering? It should be no problem leaving everything on since the channel of nutrients is not interrupted.


LOL sorry I used the wrong word! Yes I meant air layering!
Thanks Hetty!

Posted Image
0

#8 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 24 June 2011 - 06:50 PM

View Postjag, on 24 June 2011 - 06:38 PM, said:

You do not need to let it dry. And you do not need to remove any leaves or inflows. If fact, I just cut off an air-layered plant with inflos and planted it and it continued blooming without any interruption.

All I do is peel off about an inch and a half of the cambium layer around the trunk or branch with a vegetable peeler.

I tried to do a search on some pictures I had posted, but I don't think they are in the archives any longer. Here they are again.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1521.jpg

I use Glad Press n Seal plastic wrap to make a bag and pack it with moistened coir. You can also use dampened peat moss or spaghum moss.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1522.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1523.jpg

This is what it looked like after I separated it from the mother plant.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1528.jpg

To me, that is the beauty of airlayering, there is no interruption in the growth of the plant. I do it often with seedlings when they get too tall while I am waiting for then to bloom.


Thanks for the info, Joe! I'm so glad to hear that the air-layered plant can just keep on growing (what's important to me is the inflos, I really don't want to lose them!).
Posted Image
0

#9 User is offline   Shadow 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 826
  • Joined: 21-January 09
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:So CA

Posted 24 June 2011 - 08:49 PM

Wow, Thanks for the info.
Seems pretty easy
Never tried it before but looks like I need to try it.

Got a few that could benefit from it.

:)
Posted Image
0

#10 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 24 June 2011 - 09:03 PM

Two questions for you, Joe: How long does it usually take for the roots to form? And is it OK to leave the plant in the sun (will the roots cook inside the plastic wrap)?
Thanks!

Posted Image
0

#11 User is offline   plumania 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 17-September 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Florida
  • Interests:Gardening ,fragrant plants,Plumeria, Roses and too many other 'interests' to list here.

Posted 25 June 2011 - 04:02 AM

Joe, I noticed that in the last picture under the root part, you have peeled off superficial layers. Are you going to dry it before you plant it so it does not get infected there? Do you cover the rooted part as you wait for the peeled part to dry up? I guess you do that to increase rooting area. Also, can this be done in the 'green' part of a branch or does it have to be 'grey' or mature area?
Thanks for the wonderful demonstration. :)
Posted Image
0

#12 User is offline   Jandey 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 139
  • Joined: 01-December 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Central Texas

Posted 25 June 2011 - 06:11 AM

Wow, Joe, thanks for that great pictorial. I was always kinda fuzzy on the details of air-layering. Great questions from everyone, too!

Now, can someone please explain to me why my pictures won't post?! :unsure:

Jen
0

#13 User is offline   Lakers3221 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 412
  • Joined: 22-November 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Goleta, Ca.

Posted 26 June 2011 - 06:28 AM

Thanks for the post. I bought a very large tree over the winter that I planted in the ground that has a huge branch that needs to be removed(growing across others). I was thinking of air layering it and now I definitely will.
There is a fine line between hobby and mental illness.
0

#14 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 26 June 2011 - 05:04 PM

OK, so following the helpful information from Joe, I tried air-layering for the 1st time. I hope the plants will take it. Can't wait to see some roots inside the plastic.
Both plants are now recovering in the shade after the "surgery" :-)
http://i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz276/beachanytime/airlayered26-26-11-1.jpg

http://i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz276/beachanytime/AIRLAYERED6-26-11.jpg
Posted Image
0

#15 User is offline   jag 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 712
  • Joined: 17-May 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA

Posted 26 June 2011 - 07:11 PM

Quote

Two questions for you, Joe: How long does it usually take for the roots to form? And is it OK to leave the plant in the sun (will the roots cook inside the plastic wrap)?
Thanks!


It takes from four to eight weeks. You will be able to see how established the root ball is if you use a clear plastic bag or wrap. I have done it with and without applying rooting hormone. You can apply the rooting hormone with a small painting brush.

Quote

Joe, I noticed that in the last picture under the root part, you have peeled off superficial layers. Are you going to dry it before you plant it so it does not get infected there? Do you cover the rooted part as you wait for the peeled part to dry up? I guess you do that to increase rooting area. Also, can this be done in the 'green' part of a branch or does it have to be 'grey' or mature area?


I plant it as soon as I cut it and unwrap it. I leave that layer. It gives the plant more support when you plant it.

I have always air-layered with mature wood. I never tried it with the green part, so I can't comment.

Here is a plant I separated from the mother plant and planted about a week ago.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/033.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/024-1.jpg

I would have had to stand on a ladder to photograph these blooms if I had left them on the plant. Now I have a plant that is easier to admire.
Joe

Posted Image
0

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users