Plumeria Forum: Air Rooting A Branch That Has Inflos - Plumeria Forum

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Air Rooting A Branch That Has Inflos Rate Topic: -----

#16 User is offline   plumania 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 17-September 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Florida
  • Interests:Gardening ,fragrant plants,Plumeria, Roses and too many other 'interests' to list here.

Posted 27 June 2011 - 02:44 AM

View Postjag, on 26 June 2011 - 07:11 PM, said:

Quote

Two questions for you, Joe: How long does it usually take for the roots to form? And is it OK to leave the plant in the sun (will the roots cook inside the plastic wrap)?
Thanks!


It takes from four to eight weeks. You will be able to see how established the root ball is if you use a clear plastic bag or wrap. I have done it with and without applying rooting hormone. You can apply the rooting hormone with a small painting brush.

Quote

Joe, I noticed that in the last picture under the root part, you have peeled off superficial layers. Are you going to dry it before you plant it so it does not get infected there? Do you cover the rooted part as you wait for the peeled part to dry up? I guess you do that to increase rooting area. Also, can this be done in the 'green' part of a branch or does it have to be 'grey' or mature area?


I plant it as soon as I cut it and unwrap it. I leave that layer. It gives the plant more support when you plant it.

I have always air-layered with mature wood. I never tried it with the green part, so I can't comment.

Here is a plant I separated from the mother plant and planted about a week ago.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/033.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/024-1.jpg

I would have had to stand on a ladder to photograph these blooms if I had left them on the plant. Now I have a plant that is easier to admire.


Cool.I am going to try it for sure. Many thanks.
Posted Image
0

#17 User is offline   Dutchlady 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 2,739
  • Joined: 20-November 08
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Southwest Florida

Posted 27 June 2011 - 02:45 AM

And well worth admiring!!!

The method most growers use is put on a plastic bag, then wrap the whole thing in aluminum foil. That keeps the new baby roots from burning.
Posted Image
0

#18 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 27 June 2011 - 06:04 AM

I just added aluminum foil around the plastic bags this morning. Thanks for the info, Hetty!
Posted Image
0

#19 User is offline   Beachanytime 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Laguna Hills, CA
  • Interests:The beach, traveling, gardening, watercolor painting, cooking, and of course, plumerias

Posted 27 June 2011 - 06:28 AM

View Postjag, on 26 June 2011 - 07:11 PM, said:

Quote

Two questions for you, Joe: How long does it usually take for the roots to form? And is it OK to leave the plant in the sun (will the roots cook inside the plastic wrap)?
Thanks!


It takes from four to eight weeks. You will be able to see how established the root ball is if you use a clear plastic bag or wrap. I have done it with and without applying rooting hormone. You can apply the rooting hormone with a small painting brush.

Quote

Joe, I noticed that in the last picture under the root part, you have peeled off superficial layers. Are you going to dry it before you plant it so it does not get infected there? Do you cover the rooted part as you wait for the peeled part to dry up? I guess you do that to increase rooting area. Also, can this be done in the 'green' part of a branch or does it have to be 'grey' or mature area?


I plant it as soon as I cut it and unwrap it. I leave that layer. It gives the plant more support when you plant it.

I have always air-layered with mature wood. I never tried it with the green part, so I can't comment.

Here is a plant I separated from the mother plant and planted about a week ago.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/033.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/2011%20PLUMERIA/024-1.jpg

I would have had to stand on a ladder to photograph these blooms if I had left them on the plant. Now I have a plant that is easier to admire.


Your severed plant looks very healthy, and the flowers are very nice! Love those veins radiating from the center (does it have a name?).
If it takes 4 to 8 weeks, I much prefer this method vs. cutting and rooting the branches which takes the same amount of time or more, and in the meantime the branches are just sticks with no leaves or flowers.
I might start doing this to the majority of my tall plants, but I'll wait a few weeks to make sure that my first 2 air-layered plants are OK first, before "operating" on the rest of them :-)

Posted Image
0

#20 User is offline   LolasMom 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 1,207
  • Joined: 26-November 08

Posted 27 June 2011 - 06:55 AM

Wow..great topic..Plumania..does your beautiful plumie have a name..love it
Posted Image
0

#21 User is offline   plumania 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 17-September 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Florida
  • Interests:Gardening ,fragrant plants,Plumeria, Roses and too many other 'interests' to list here.

Posted 27 June 2011 - 07:10 AM

View PostLolasMom, on 27 June 2011 - 06:55 AM, said:

Wow..great topic..Plumania..does your beautiful plumie have a name..love it



I assume you are asking about my siggy- Aztec Gold.
Unless ...it is about Joe's (aka Jag) featured Plumeria which has this adorable bloom and it rooted while on mother tree!

Joe -2 questions-
1.What is the name of the Plumeria you showed for demo?
2.Generally we wait for the cut end to dry to avoid infection. Do you not wait on air layered plant's bottom part to callous ?
Posted Image
0

#22 User is offline   jag 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 712
  • Joined: 17-May 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA

Posted 27 June 2011 - 07:47 PM

Quote

Joe -2 questions-
1.What is the name of the Plumeria you showed for demo?
2.Generally we wait for the cut end to dry to avoid infection. Do you not wait on air layered plant's bottom part to callous ?


1. That is a seedling of mine which I named Julie Christine after my daughter. The mother plant is an unknown I have had for years, that doesn't look like any named variety I am familiar with, which I named after my wife.

2. I plant it right away. The callous on a cutting comes from the cambium layer. Eventually, that's where the roots start. If I wanted, I could have cut it off, but I would be afraid I would damage some roots because they are so fragile at that stage.
Joe

Posted Image
0

#23 User is offline   plumania 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 928
  • Joined: 17-September 10
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Florida
  • Interests:Gardening ,fragrant plants,Plumeria, Roses and too many other 'interests' to list here.

Posted 28 June 2011 - 03:12 AM

View Postjag, on 27 June 2011 - 07:47 PM, said:

Quote

Joe -2 questions-
1.What is the name of the Plumeria you showed for demo?
2.Generally we wait for the cut end to dry to avoid infection. Do you not wait on air layered plant's bottom part to callous ?


1. That is a seedling of mine which I named Julie Christine after my daughter. The mother plant is an unknown I have had for years, that doesn't look like any named variety I am familiar with, which I named after my wife.

2. I plant it right away. The callous on a cutting comes from the cambium layer. Eventually, that's where the roots start. If I wanted, I could have cut it off, but I would be afraid I would damage some roots because they are so fragile at that stage.


Thanks.
Posted Image
0

#24 User is offline   plumiecharmer 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 248
  • Joined: 25-November 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:On walkabout

Posted 30 June 2011 - 08:08 PM

View PostBeachanytime, on 24 June 2011 - 10:58 AM, said:

I have several plants with long big branches that have inflos on them, and would like to air-root them to make them shorter plants


This is a great topic with practical application of methods that can be used to promote growing plumeria succesfully! Myself I would have chosen to graft the branches, but sure why not air layer? Fantastic instructions and pictorial by the way!

Just keep in mind that some plumeria species have a growth habit that wants to grow tall and leggy like Aztec Gold, Cancun Pink, Plastic Pink to name a few... Cutting them down will make them short for now, but they may resort to growing leggy again. just an FYI ;)
0

#25 User is offline   Shadow 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 826
  • Joined: 21-January 09
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:So CA

Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:06 AM

Does it have to be wrapped in plastic?
I'm wondering if bandaging it with a cloth would allow it to breathe better & it could be maintained moist by misting. However the plastic method allows one to monitor the rooting.

:unsure:
Posted Image
0

#26 User is offline   jag 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 712
  • Joined: 17-May 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Baton Rouge, LA

Posted 09 July 2011 - 05:50 PM

I would be worried that the rooting medium, with frequent rains and watering, could get too wet if you bandaged it with cloth and it could rot. You don't want the rooting medium to be too wet.
Joe

Posted Image
0

#27 User is offline   Shadow 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 826
  • Joined: 21-January 09
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:So CA

Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:05 PM

Check got the point but not much chance of rain here... :P

I was thinking about the aluminum foil...
could that intensify heat & cook the stem?

:unsure:
Posted Image
0

#28 User is offline   underthecherrymoon 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 21-March 10
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 16 July 2011 - 11:32 AM

View Postjag, on 26 June 2011 - 07:11 PM, said:

Quote

Two questions for you, Joe: How long does it usually take for the roots to form? And is it OK to leave the plant in the sun (will the roots cook inside the plastic wrap)?
Thanks!


It takes from four to eight weeks. You will be able to see how established the root ball is if you use a clear plastic bag or wrap. I have done it with and without applying rooting hormone. You can apply the rooting hormone with a small painting brush.


What about the sun issue? I have a plant that I want to do this to but it's in full sun... I guess the aluminum layer would help protect the baby roots?
0

#29 User is offline   printmaster 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 196
  • Joined: 20-July 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Texas
  • Interests:God, Family, Golf, Hunting, and Horticulture.

Posted 04 August 2011 - 03:19 AM

Thanks for the info; Joe!
0

#30 User is offline   Baby_Love 

  • Advanced Member
  • PipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 54
  • Joined: 10-August 11
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 August 2011 - 12:42 PM

View Postjag, on 24 June 2011 - 06:38 PM, said:

You do not need to let it dry. And you do not need to remove any leaves or inflows. If fact, I just cut off an air-layered plant with inflos and planted it and it continued blooming without any interruption.

All I do is peel off about an inch and a half of the cambium layer around the trunk or branch with a vegetable peeler.

I tried to do a search on some pictures I had posted, but I don't think they are in the archives any longer. Here they are again.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1521.jpg

I use Glad Press n Seal plastic wrap to make a bag and pack it with moistened coir. You can also use dampened peat moss or spaghum moss.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1522.jpg

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1523.jpg

This is what it looked like after I separated it from the mother plant.

http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb132/josegabriele/100_1528.jpg

To me, that is the beauty of air-layering, there is no interruption in the growth of the plant. I do it often with seedlings when they get too tall while I am waiting for then to bloom.


Wow, that's awesome! Thanks for sharing the pics. I have noticed on a couple of mine that were scraped or bent that roots started growing out of that area without me doing anything to it. Pretty neat.
0

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users