Plumeria Forum: Can All Plumerias Survive Intense Heat - Plumeria Forum

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Can All Plumerias Survive Intense Heat Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Edie 

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 07:54 PM

ok all you plumeria experts....I have a question! Can all plumeria survive intense heat if they are shaded or do some varieties fair better than others. I have some cuttings that I am rooting and would like to get a few more. All the local nurseries only sell the plain red, pink, white, and yellow plumies but i really like the more exotic ones. Have any of you hot weather friends have had any luck with the different varieties and if so which ones have been successful?

Edie
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#2 User is offline   Bfishy 

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 08:23 PM

Im with ya Edie. Same deal here, locals only have the plain ole everyday garden varieties and I am not a plain ole everyday garden guy. From what I have picked up, the more heat the better, of course everything has a limit. As far as the other varities go, I dont think there is a much of a differance in temperature tolerances, but some do root easier then others. The local garden varities probably being the easiest since thats all I had ever messed with before and never did anything but cut a branch off and jab it in the ground, leaves and all.
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#3 User is offline   ijplume 

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 10:05 PM

Hi Edie,

You might find this website interesting ... http://www.azplumeria.org ... as they're growing plumerias in Arizona. You could use the "contact us" button and ask questions. Also, there is a plumeria society that meets in the Palm Springs area. I think it's called the Coachella Valley Plumeria Society. I don't have contact info for them but could get it if you're interested. Irene
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#4 User is offline   Mythical 

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 10:28 PM

I'm in "hot" California (not quite desert but real close). Where a plumeria is from really helps to determine if it will do well in "hot" CA. Varieties of Plumerias from Texas and Australia (and some from Thailand) seem to handle the hot heats better. (If the place it's from has similar weather, the chances are that it will deal well with ours. A lot of varieties from Florida, Louisiana, and Hawaii (after all, everything originally came from Mexico) will also do well but sometimes there are varieties that really like less heat and more humidity--it's a bit of a "crap shoot". I can recommend a lot of Elizabeth Thornton's varieties--my Mardi Gras seems to really like our weather. (Please keep all rooting cuttings out of direct sun--direct sun is a killer--I hate sunburn!)
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#5 User is offline   Rastabacko13 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:00 AM

I found that some of mine lost a leaf or two when really hot, but generally are fine. I have two cuttings from a place in SA called Port Augusta, 300 clicks north of Adelaide, on the bottom of our expansive deserts. Pt Augusta gets seriously hot, and for quite a long time, and minimum humidity. I have a cutting that did not blink in our heat wave, did not burn and kept flowering. Obviously a much harder heat variety.

I think when establihsed they will all cope ok with heat. As long as they have some water, if they are really dry, or zero humidity, probably will have some problems.



Brett
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#6 User is offline   Rastabacko13 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:03 AM

View PostMythical, on Jun 12 2009, 03:58 PM, said:

I can recommend a lot of Elizabeth Thornton's varieties--my Mardi Gras seems to really like our weather. (Please keep all rooting cuttings out of direct sun--direct sun is a killer--I hate sunburn!)



That sounds good, i have a few of these seedlings!! and we are very similar to California climate!

Brett
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#7 User is offline   Edie 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:06 PM

Well I'll just keep at it and hope they make it. The Coachella valley Plumeria Society is fairly new and they only have a meeting every two months for now. I'm looking forward to going to their next meeting in July. I met the preident and he said they only have about 70 members so far. So if anyone out there lives close to the desert area I'm sure you would be welcome. The more the merrier.
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#8 User is offline   KiwiAndMango 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 02:49 PM

Here in Florida I notice that the plumeria in the ground do not seem to suffer as much from extreme heat as the potted ones, which exhibit drooping leaves etc. They are on a very hot patio - too hot to walk on- with no shade. If my feet burn (and I'm no sissy, basically barefoot since I was born (even in NJ), I put flip flops on for fancy outings), I can only imagine what the heat does to the roots that are just inches away.
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Posted 12 June 2009 - 03:08 PM

Just keep good air circulation & make sure you water them when they get dry (in SE TX I have to water every day - they are all in pots).
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#10 User is offline   Edie 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 07:57 PM

View PostKiwiAndMango, on Jun 12 2009, 03:49 PM, said:

Here in Florida I notice that the plumeria in the ground do not seem to suffer as much from extreme heat as the potted ones, which exhibit drooping leaves etc. They are on a very hot patio - too hot to walk on- with no shade. If my feet burn (and I'm no sissy, basically barefoot since I was born (even in NJ), I put flip flops on for fancy outings), I can only imagine what the heat does to the roots that are just inches away.



:lol: :angry: Me too i have Swarovski Crystal flipflops..........soooooooo comfy. What kinds of plumeria do you have?
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#11 User is offline   Edie 

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 07:59 PM

View PostScent Gardener, on Jun 12 2009, 04:08 PM, said:

Just keep good air circulation & make sure you water them when they get dry (in SE TX I have to water every day - they are all in pots).



Should I water the ones that are starting to root??? Most have leaves , some are getting little inflos, but some are a little squishy...could that be from not enough water?
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#12 User is offline   KiwiAndMango 

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 12:31 PM

View PostEdie, on Jun 12 2009, 11:57 PM, said:

:blink: :( Me too i have Swarovski Crystal flipflops..........soooooooo comfy. What kinds of plumeria do you have?


Waaay too many to name - but never enough. My recently aquireds include San Miguel, Thumbalina, Coral Cream, and I have a Richard Criley Rainbow coming from Brad. My faves are Kona Hybrid, Aztec Gold, Grapette, India and Hurricane.

But I don't have Swarovski flip flops...yet. Uggs for everyday wear, Crocs for gardening, and Gucci for formal occasions.
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#13 User is offline   KiwiAndMango 

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 12:39 PM

Ok, just burnt my feet again. So,I put a thermometer on the patio(actually the sensor for our remote one, that' usually in the shade). It went from reading 89 in the shade to 111. The sensor is on a little stand so it doesn't make direct contact witht ground. It's few inches up, right about plumie root level.

We've had no break from the bakery. Normally we get afternoon showers, or at least cloud cover when the sea breeze comes in everyday. I am starting to notice that the patio plumies that get some late afternoon shade are looking much better than the ones that get direct sun sunrise to sunset. I'm going to move them to part shade and see if they improve.
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#14 User is offline   Edie 

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 03:52 PM

View PostKiwiAndMango, on Jun 15 2009, 01:39 PM, said:

Ok, just burnt my feet again. So,I put a thermometer on the patio(actually the sensor for our remote one, that' usually in the shade). It went from reading 89 in the shade to 111. The sensor is on a little stand so it doesn't make direct contact witht ground. It's few inches up, right about plumie root level.

We've had no break from the bakery. Normally we get afternoon showers, or at least cloud cover when the sea breeze comes in everyday. I am starting to notice that the patio plumies that get some late afternoon shade are looking much better than the ones that get direct sun sunrise to sunset. I'm going to move them to part shade and see if they improve.


I didn't know that Florida got so hot, that sounds like the Calif. desert but more humid. Sounds like you have a nice collection. I'm jealous, mine collection is just getting started and I lost many of them due to sunburn. I will get good aat this someday soon I hope!
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#15 User is offline   KiwiAndMango 

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 04:13 PM

Your collection will grow, trust me. I have given up shopping to fund my garden - I've given up Burberry for Burton Yellow. I don't buy cuttings anymore. as a rule. As you have, I've lost many. Now I only buy rooted or grafted plants, which are more expensive but worth it to me. I have really good results from grafteds- I get fabulous blooms the first season. I have good success with my own cuttings, but terrible results with purchased from HI or CA. So, I don't try to buck the system, I go with the flow.
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